Posts Tagged ‘Gutekanst’

Local Spelt, Pulled Pork and Paw Paw Pizza

late summer 2014 274ii Here is the pizza that I placed those elegant eggs upon. I used a local spelt flour that is grown only 22 miles from my pizzeria and Kiser’s Barbecue which is simply the best anywhere! A traditionalist may say that I put too much stuff on this pizza but I couldn’t resist combining the great fresh ancho peppers that I roasted and local beetroot. So I took it upon myself to make a full spectrum analysis of flavor! Lets do this one fassssst.

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Roast the ancho pepper and two small, halved beets in foil for 20 minutes in a 450 degree oven. (You can roast the pepper over an open gas flame on a burner also.) Pull the skin off and cut the ancho into strips and the beets into small slices. Take the 12 ounces of the spelt flour and bang out a pizza disc. place chopped cheddar cheese on the dough then the pulled pork, beet slices and ancho slices.

late summer 2014 263ii Place the pizza into a 475 degree oven and cook until golden brown, about 12 to 15 minutes.  Dress with the paw paw pulp in a semi-disgustingly looking circles.  See last blog entry.

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Now is time for the finale, slice the paw paw eggs on the pizza and then a little chopped cilantro or arugula in the center. You’ll feel glory at the way you are able to manipulate a local, wild food product into a sweet, savory, spicy pizza as you scratch at the exquisite pain from poison ivy, mosquito bites and thorn scrapes from being in the forest too long. Life is great!

To Kill a Mockingcurd

 

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It’s a simple fact that fresh Mozzarella is the number-one melting paradise on any pizza. In fact, mozzarella is to pizza what leprosy is to diseases…or Jack the Ripper is to serial killers, bad analogies? Maybe, but using cheese that you have fabricated with your own hands shouldn’t be a scary task.

Melting mozzarella from curd takes the seemingly simple endeavor of making a pizza to the next culinary level.  This old-school method is seldom used in these days of corporate cheese manufacturing but taking the time to craft mozzarella makes a pizza very personal. This is the level of the long-ago craftsman who took pride and responsibility in cooking and operated with the gratification that every aspect of their pizza was simple and perfect!

There is a big difference between making fresh mozzarella and using pre-made mozzarella. The melt on any pizza is more buttery with a tinge of yellow you can’t get with corporate mozzarella which tends to leach out a milky sputum over a pizza when cooked with high heat.

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Now, it seems as though everyone has their own method to melt mozzarella from fresh curd but I rely on what an old Italian guy named Giuseppe showed me on the cliffs of Positano, Italy in 2011. It is a simple and straightforward way whose only tenant is, “Be patient, let the curd melt itself”. This has worked for me, so I stick with it.

Some mozzarella-melters take the slow method of heating the curd with hotter and hotter water while pulling and stretching over and over. I use a simpler method of holding smallish pieces on my pizza ovens until just warmer than room temp, (78-85 degrees) then pouring the hot, salty water over them as you can see in this video.

And here’s the Pizza I made with this mozzarella. Please forgive the abruptness of the starts and finishes, we were in the middle of service at the time.

I hope you get the time to make fresh mozzarella. It’s a great experience!