To Kill a Mockingcurd

 

2014 late summer 029ii 2014 late summer 312ii

It’s a simple fact that fresh Mozzarella is the number-one melting paradise on any pizza. In fact, mozzarella is to pizza what leprosy is to diseases…or Jack the Ripper is to serial killers, bad analogies? Maybe, but using cheese that you have fabricated with your own hands shouldn’t be a scary task.

Melting mozzarella from curd takes the seemingly simple endeavor of making a pizza to the next culinary level.  This old-school method is seldom used in these days of corporate cheese manufacturing but taking the time to craft mozzarella makes a pizza very personal. This is the level of the long-ago craftsman who took pride and responsibility in cooking and operated with the gratification that every aspect of their pizza was simple and perfect!

There is a big difference between making fresh mozzarella and using pre-made mozzarella. The melt on any pizza is more buttery with a tinge of yellow you can’t get with corporate mozzarella which tends to leach out a milky sputum over a pizza when cooked with high heat.

2014 late summer 023ii 2014 late summer 024ii 2014 late summer 026ii 2014 late summer 030ii

Now, it seems as though everyone has their own method to melt mozzarella from fresh curd but I rely on what an old Italian guy named Giuseppe showed me on the cliffs of Positano, Italy in 2011. It is a simple and straightforward way whose only tenant is, “Be patient, let the curd melt itself”. This has worked for me, so I stick with it.

Some mozzarella-melters take the slow method of heating the curd with hotter and hotter water while pulling and stretching over and over. I use a simpler method of holding smallish pieces on my pizza ovens until just warmer than room temp, (78-85 degrees) then pouring the hot, salty water over them as you can see in this video.

And here’s the Pizza I made with this mozzarella. Please forgive the abruptness of the starts and finishes, we were in the middle of service at the time.

I hope you get the time to make fresh mozzarella. It’s a great experience!


One Response to “To Kill a Mockingcurd”

  1. […] Some mozzarella-melters take the slow method of heating the curd with hotter and hotter water while pulling and stretching over and over. I use a simpler …read more […]

Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas

 

summer 2014 188ii summer 2014 191ii

The fruit of summer is a full landslide now in middle American Ohio. This means some great chances to pack my pizzas with the sweet goodness of local foodstuffs. Here are two sweet fruits that I’ve paired with a low-hydrated dough and sharp piquant cheese to achieve a fresh, juicy agrodolce, (sweet and sour taste) that everyone with taste buds loves. The shape of these pizzas resembles the Spanish Coca and is a fantastic way to introduce this fantastic food to your friends.

summer 2014 171ii summer 2014 174ii

Lets first start with the tomato coca. I used some of the great heirloom grown by Green Edge Gardens of Amesville, Ohio. My all time fave is the Cherokee Purple followed by the Green Zebra and Mr. Stipey brings up the rear on this great coca. First I added about five ounces of shredded aged mozzarella and provolone and slid torn pieces of basil in between each slice followed by extra virgin olive oil and coarse sea salt.

summer 2014 167ii summer 2014 169ii

The next coca is a finger-licking pear pizza featuring some local pears from Neil Cherry of Cherry Orchards in Crooksville, Ohio. Under the sweet pear is some great English Stilton and then I topped the coca with some chopped Marcona almonds.

summer 2014 187ii summer 2014 195ii

After assembling these coca, I blasted them at 550 degrees. If you are making these at home, try to cook them with a high heat, (above 485 if you can), because you don’t want the “melt”, (This is a soggy mess and separation of juices from the fruit that you get when the fruit is cooked a low temperature)-plus the dough will not crisp up enough to hold up to the weight of the fruit. To check for doneness, lift a slice in the middle and look for undercooked cheese and dough gumline.

 


11 Responses to “Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas”

  1. […] After assembling these coca, I blasted them at 550 degrees. If you are making these at home, try to cook them with a high heat, (above 485 if you can), because you don’t want the “melt”, (This is a soggy mess and separation of juices from the fruit that you get when the fruit is cooked a low …read more […]

  2. best self spray tan

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  3. doumbek drum lessons for beginners

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  4. hcg weight loss tips

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  5. davul zurna says:

    davul zurna

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  6. turkish percussion group harem room

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  7. marketing social media

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  8. best moving companies scottsdale az

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  9. how to make fake tan at home

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  10. old tappan nj restaurants

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog

  11. percussionist gia sacred music

    Two Wet, Wild and Wonderful Summer Cocas – PizzaGoon: Pizza Blog